Jimmy Perry, one of Britain’s most successful comedy writers, has passed away at the age of 93.

Perry, best known for writing TV series “Dad’s Army”, “It Ain’t Half Hot Mum” and “Hi-de-Hi”, passed away at home here following a battle with a short illness on Sunday, reports mirror.co.uk.

At the start of World War II, Perry joined the Home Guard, a part-time defence force. He was drafted into the army in 1941, and served with a troupe of entertainers who put on concerts for British soldiers stationed in the Far East.

After the war, Perry trained as an actor, and worked as an entertainer in holiday camps, and as an actor-entertainer in theaters and on TV.

He also wrote his own material, and in the early 1960s pitched an idea for a comedy series based on his time in the Home Guard to TV producer David Croft. Croft became Perry’s writing partner and their show, “Dad’s Army”, ran from 1968 for nine years with 80 episodes.

Perry and Croft’s creative partnership continued for 25 years. Among their other shows was “It Ain’t Half Hot Mum”, which drew on their war-time experiences as entertainers in the Far East.

Perry and Croft also came together for “Hi-de-Hi,” which fed off Perry’s time in the holiday camps. The series launched in 1980, running for eight years, and was BAFTA-nominated several times.

Perry is survived by his partner costume designer Mary Husband.

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