Nepalese-American fashion designer Prabal Gurung has said Bollywood actress Sonam Kapoor is experimental with clothes and Priyanka Chopra redefined the image of modern women.

Prabal is a New York-based new age fashion designer who not only celebrates the feminism and gender equality on the fashion ramp but also managed to design for many iconic women.

Some of the well-known women for whom he has designed include the US First Lady Michelle Obama, Lady Gaga, Priyanka Chopra, Katrina Kaif, Sonam Kapoor, Anushka Sharma and Alia Bhatt.

Asked to choose his favourite Bollywood star, Gurung, whose designs are heavily influenced by Bollywood, told IANS: “While Sonam is very experimental with clothes and can pull off any dress wonderfully, I think Priyanka has redefined the image of modern Indian women.”

“She (Priyanka) is a Bollywood superstar who is also ruling the American entertainment industry! It’s amazing,” he said.

“On the other hand, Sonam has changed the image of film actresses fashionably. Having said that, I must mention that Alia is very interesting! She is the youth fashion icon,” the designer said.

The designer is in Mumbai for his SS17 collection inspired by Gloria Steinem’s poignant book – My Life On The Road.

Born to Nepali parents, living in Delhi, Mumbai and New York, the diverse cultural exposure helped him to create his signature style on women’s dressing.

“I can fuse various traditional elements with modern edgy dressing with ease. In addition, of course my mother is a big inspiration for me. When it comes to Bollywood fashion, I like Waheeda Rehman from yesteryear’s heroines, among others.

“I wish to work for Bollywood filmmakers like Karan Johar and Sanjay Leela Bhansali,” he said.

Though he fulfilled his mother’s dream of designing for the First Lady, while asked about what makes him feel like an achiever, he said: “I cherish both the facts happily as a fashion designer but I feel the sense of achievement when I look at the effort of Shikshya Foundation Nepal where our work managed to bring changes in around 1,500 girls’ lives.”

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