Chinese producer Xin Ningning, Russian producer Natalia Mokritskaya, Brazilian producer Francis Vogner Dos Reis and South African producer Dumisane Gumbi say that unlike India, where producers complain of not getting proper support from the government, governments of other BRICS members are very helpful towards providing funds to filmmakers.

At a panel discussion here at the 1st BRICS Film Festival, the four foreign producers along with B.B.L. Madhukar, Secretary General – BRICS CCI, talked about how the five BRICS member countries can look forward to various film collaborations through their respective government support.

Dumisane said that without the government support in South Africa, the “film industry there wouldn’t have existed”.

“We have got National Film and Video Foundation (NFVF), which helps in developments of some of the films. It doesn’t give a lot of money, but it helps,” Dumisane said.

“For any film that you make on a certain amount of budget, you get 35 percent back. Five to 10 years ago, we were making about five-six films a year. Through that government support, now we are making over 30 films a year.

“Without government, we would be struggling to make films in South Africa,” he added.

However in India, apart from National Film Development Corporation (NFDC), filmmakers don’t have much options from the government’s side.

About Brazil film industry, Reis said: “In Brazil, most of the money comes from government support. We have a lot of money, but we really don’t know how to invest it in building a market.

“For me, the principle question is that the government needs to set rules for the American film industry, which dominates 85 percent of Brazilian cinema.”

Xin shared that in China, apart from the government support, “these days a lot of private investors are there who are investing huge money in films”.

Similar were Mokritskaya’s views.

She said: “In Russia, we don’t have non governmental cinema. There the government gives funds for films because they feel films are like policies made for the benifit of people. Russian film market is not too big.”

Sharing insights about the film industry, Madhukar said that it is more dependable on private sector.

Asked whether in near future there will be relevant support from the government’s side for filmmakers, he said: “Well, we don’t see that possibility anytime soon. The government feels that films are a private initiative which are made for promotional reasons.”

He added: “Also if the government support is there, then the film needs to mention the ruling party in positive light. As per state support, they say that if there is any film dealing with our state, then only we will provide funds.”

The panel discussion, titled “BRICS Film Market: Opportunities and Challenges”, also put light on the idea that a treaty should be signed between all the five BRICS members which will help filmmaker of a particular nation to get financial support from other countries.

The 1st BRICS Film Festival, which is part of the special events planned in the run-up to the 8th BRICS Summit to be held in India, kicked off here at Siri Fort Auditorium Complex on September 2.

The festival will end on Tuesday.